The thermostat has been around for a long time

The electric thermostat was developed by Warren Johnson.

With December just around the corner, Boston has gotten quite cold. It seems that whenever I return home at the end of the day, I have to turn up the heat in my apartment, because wherever it's already set just isn't warm enough.

As I was bundling up against the chill yesterday evening, I wondered what people did before they were able to walk up to the thermostat and turn up the heat. That got me thinking about when the first one of these devices was created, and I decided to do a little research.

It turns out that the first manual thermostat was developed by Warren Johnson during the late 1800s. When others were figuring out about electric lights and power plants, Johnson wanted to use this kind of technology in a more comforting way.

In 1883 he applied for and received his first patent for what would become the world's first electric thermostat. In fact, the company that he founded to create these devices, Johnson Controls, is still in existence today.

I think its amazing that so much of my house runs on the same technology that was used all those years ago. The manual thermostat in my apartment does exactly what it's supposed to do every time I go to adjust the temperature.

This evening when I head in from work, I'm going to think of Warren Johnson when I go to turn up the temperature. After all, it's because of him that I'm able to adjust the heat in my house to a desirable level, and save energy by turning it down. It's easy to forget that simple appliances like this one were invented by smart people too.With December just around the corner, Boston has gotten quite cold. It seems that whenever I return home at the end of the day, I have to turn up the heat in my apartment, because wherever it's already set just isn't warm enough.

As I was bundling up against the chill yesterday evening, I wondered what people did before they were able to walk up to the thermostat and turn up the heat. That got me thinking about when the first one of these devices was created, and I decided to do a little research.

It turns out that the first manual thermostat was developed by Warren Johnson during the late 1800s. When others were figuring out about electric lights and power plants, Johnson wanted to use this kind of technology in a more comforting way.

In 1883 he applied for and received his first patent for what would become the world's first electric thermostat. In fact, the company that he founded to create these devices, Johnson Controls, is still in existence today.

I think its amazing that so much of my house runs on the same technology that was used all those years ago. The manual thermostat in my apartment does exactly what it's supposed to do every time I go to adjust the temperature.

This evening when I head in from work, I'm going to think of Warren Johnson when I go to turn up the temperature. After all, it's because of him that I'm able to adjust the heat in my house to a desirable level, and save energy by turning it down. It's easy to forget that simple appliances like this one were invented by smart people too.With December just around the corner, Boston has gotten quite cold. It seems that whenever I return home at the end of the day, I have to turn up the heat in my apartment, because wherever it's already set just isn't warm enough.

As I was bundling up against the chill yesterday evening, I wondered what people did before they were able to walk up to the thermostat and turn up the heat. That got me thinking about when the first one of these devices was created, and I decided to do a little research.

It turns out that the first manual thermostat was developed by Warren Johnson during the late 1800s. When others were figuring out about electric lights and power plants, Johnson wanted to use this kind of technology in a more comforting way.

In 1883 he applied for and received his first patent for what would become the world's first electric thermostat. In fact, the company that he founded to create these devices, Johnson Controls, is still in existence today.

I think its amazing that so much of my house runs on the same technology that was used all those years ago. The manual thermostat in my apartment does exactly what it's supposed to do every time I go to adjust the temperature.

This evening when I head in from work, I'm going to think of Warren Johnson when I go to turn up the temperature. After all, it's because of him that I'm able to adjust the heat in my house to a desirable level, and save energy by turning it down. It's easy to forget that simple appliances like this one were invented by smart people too.With December just around the corner, Boston has gotten quite cold. It seems that whenever I return home at the end of the day, I have to turn up the heat in my apartment, because wherever it's already set just isn't warm enough.

As I was bundling up against the chill yesterday evening, I wondered what people did before they were able to walk up to the thermostat and turn up the heat. That got me thinking about when the first one of these devices was created, and I decided to do a little research.

It turns out that the first manual thermostat was developed by Warren Johnson during the late 1800s. When others were figuring out about electric lights and power plants, Johnson wanted to use this kind of technology in a more comforting way.

In 1883 he applied for and received his first patent for what would become the world's first electric thermostat. In fact, the company that he founded to create these devices, Johnson Controls, is still in existence today.

I think its amazing that so much of my house runs on the same technology that was used all those years ago. The manual thermostat in my apartment does exactly what it's supposed to do every time I go to adjust the temperature.

This evening when I head in from work, I'm going to think of Warren Johnson when I go to turn up the temperature. After all, it's because of him that I'm able to adjust the heat in my house to a desirable level, and save energy by turning it down. It's easy to forget that simple appliances like this one were invented by smart people too.With December just around the corner, Boston has gotten quite cold. It seems that whenever I return home at the end of the day, I have to turn up the heat in my apartment, because wherever it's already set just isn't warm enough.

As I was bundling up against the chill yesterday evening, I wondered what people did before they were able to walk up to the thermostat and turn up the heat. That got me thinking about when the first one of these devices was created, and I decided to do a little research.

It turns out that the first manual thermostat was developed by Warren Johnson during the late 1800s. When others were figuring out about electric lights and power plants, Johnson wanted to use this kind of technology in a more comforting way.

In 1883 he applied for and received his first patent for what would become the world's first electric thermostat. In fact, the company that he founded to create these devices, Johnson Controls, is still in existence today.

I think its amazing that so much of my house runs on the same technology that was used all those years ago. The manual thermostat in my apartment does exactly what it's supposed to do every time I go to adjust the temperature.

This evening when I head in from work, I'm going to think of Warren Johnson when I go to turn up the temperature. After all, it's because of him that I'm able to adjust the heat in my house to a desirable level, and save energy by turning it down. It's easy to forget that simple appliances like this one were invented by smart people too.

Related posts:

  1. Making the most of a manual thermostat
  2. What time of year do you turn up the heat?
  3. Saving money by dialing down the thermostat at night
  4. The right thermostat can increase workplace productivity
  5. Adjust your manual thermostat for energy benefits

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